First Line Friday and Tour Review: Beauty in Flight by Robin Patchen

Welcome to First Line Friday,

hosted by Hoarding Books.

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I wasn’t going to sign up for the Just Read Tours tour for the Beauty in Flight series by Robin Patchen, but then I read the descriptions of the first book, Beauty in Flight, and the premise intrigued me.  A young woman, now an ex-con and trying to lead a better life and not repeat the mistakes of her past by becoming involved with the wrong man.

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First Line Friday: Death in the Stocks

Welcome to First Line Friday,

hosted by Hoarding Books.

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I’m continuing my read-through of Georgette Heyer‘s country house murder mysteries with 1935’s Death in the Stocks.  This is the fourth of her twelve murder mysteries and the first to feature Detective Hannasyde.

Here is the description from the back cover of my 2009 Sourcebooks Landmark edition:

A moonlit night, a sleeping village, and an unaccountable murder…
In the dead of night, a man in evening dress is found murdered, locked in the stocks on the village green. Unfortunately for Superintendent Hannasyde, the deceased is Andrew Vereker, a man hated by nearly everyone, especially his odd and unhelpful family members.  The Verekers are as eccentric as they are corrupt, and it will take all Hannasyde’s skill at detection to determine who’s telling the truth, and who is pointing him in the wrong direction.  The question is: who in this family is clever enough to get away with murder?

 

 

And here is the first line:

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Tell Her No Lies by Kelly Irvin (quick review)

tellhernolies_coverNina Fischer has trust issues stemming from a rough childhood, and with the murder of the uncle who took her and her sister in and the reappearance of her mother, the secrets that begin to come out will make her question everything she thought she knew.  And while the reader may think they know who she should trust, and want to shout at her not to trust others, this well plotted but more sedately paced story of suspense throws twists and more than one dead body in the way.

Kelly Irvin’s Amish fiction is enjoyable, but if her debut in a new sub-genre is anything to go on, her Romantic Suspense might be even better. With an intriguing premise and characters that will hold the reader’s interest, Tell Her No Lies blends murder, betrayal, and mortal danger into a story of healing, faith, and a blossoming love.

Recommended for fans of Romantic Suspense with a faith element.


Tell Her No Lies by Kelly Irvin | Thomas Nelson, November 2018 | ebook, 352 pages

This review refers to a digital galley read through NetGalley courtesy of the publisher.  The digital galley was provided for an Instagram tour.  No review was required.  All opinions expressed are my own.


From the publisher:

Even the most admired families have secrets to hide . . .

Nina Fischer carries a camera wherever she goes—so she can view life through a filter. Safely. After her mother abandoned her to the streets, Nina has kept people at a distance, including her uncle, who adopted Nina and her sister. Wealthy and proud, he is a good man, a fair judge, and someone many in San Antonio admire.

But when he is murdered, and the detective assigned to the case accuses Nina of the crime, she knows she must act. She’s determined to use her journalism background to find the real killer. The two men in her life want to help, but can she trust them?  She’s known Rick since they were children, but now he’s an attorney whose political aspirations seem more important than Nina’s tragic loss. And then there’s Aaron, a news videographer; using their friendship could break the biggest story of his career.

Following the evidence leads Nina on a journey of discovery into her father’s shocking masquerade as a law-abiding, family-loving Christian. Unlocking these secrets could prove fatal, but it’s the only way Nina will ever be able to trust love again.

Combining romance and suspense, bestselling author Kelly Irvin’s Tell Her No Lies is a high-stakes race for the truth.

First Line Friday: The White City

Welcome to First Line Friday,

hosted by Hoarding Books.

The featured quote is from a digital galley made available for review through NetGalley and may differ from the final text.

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The Chicago World’s Fair and serial killer H.H. Holmes are at the center of The White City by Grace Hitchcock, the first in a new multi-author series from Barbour Books, True Colors: Historical Stories of Romance and American Crime.  Having watched a documentary about “The White City” in 1893 and the horrific crimes of H.H. Holmes, I am curious to see how the romance twines around all of the history and how the author handles such a despicable character.  So I snapped up a Read Now copy on GoodReads, and so far (I’m about 4% in) I am liking the heroine and the hero.

Here is the publisher’s description:

Mysterious Disappearances Taint the Chicago World’s Fair
Step into True Colors — a new series of Historical Stories of Romance and American Crime

While attending the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893, Winnifred Wylde believes she witnessed a woman being kidnapped. She tries to convince her father, an inspector with the Chicago police, to look into reports of mysterious disappearances around the White City. Inspector Wylde tries to dismiss her claims as exaggeration of an overactive imagination, but he eventually concedes to letting her go undercover as secretary to the man in question—if she takes her pistol for protection and Jude Thorpe, a policeman, for bodyguard.

Will she be able to expose H. H. Holmes’s illicit activity, or will Winnifred become his next victim?

 

And here is the first line:

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Code Name: Lise : The True Story of the Spy Who Became WWII’s Most Highly Decorated Woman by Larry Loftis (review)

codenamelise_loftis_gallerybooksShortly after beginning to read Code Name: Lise by Larry Loftis, I had to stop and double check that this was intended to be non-fiction.  The writing was engaging, the story briskly paced, and even when giving brief back story of a new individual or situation, there was a consistent narrative thread.  And that feeling continued for much of the book, even through the torture Odette Sansom, code name Lise, endured at the hands of the SS. Continue reading

First Line Friday: Freedom’s Light

Welcome to First Line Friday,

hosted by Hoarding Books.

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I finally read my first Colleen Coble novel this week!

I love discovering new authors when it is their debut and when they are new-to-me and have a backlist of books.  In a way, Freedom’s Light by  Colleen Coble is both.  It is my first read of an author with a daunting backlist and it is an early story that, according to the note from the author, was part of her journey to publication but has been waiting eighteen years for it’s own debut.  And I love that!

I reviewed it earlier this week, but today I’m sharing the first line – and I’m holding back, since the first few pages are among my favorites of this Revolutionary War novel.  Here it is: Continue reading