Letters From the Dragon’s Son by Tammy Lash (review)

How does a living legend cope when loss and grief compound upon his search for forgiveness and redemption? Letters From the Dragon’s Son by Tammy Lash set after and building upon the story begun in White Wolf and the Ash Princess, told from the point of view of Jonathan Gudwyne/White Wolf and his father – once the Captain who beat and tortured him, the White Boar of Ojibwe legend who enslaved them, but now a changed man known as Avery.

Letters From the Dragon’s Son is an emotional and engrossing work of Historical Fiction that tugged my thoughts and heart to and fro, written in a way that somehow makes a story of English, Ojibwe, and faith in the New World of the 1600’s seem like something completely new.

Full of flawed and wonderful characters, this is a story that slowly enfolds the reader, releasing them in the end to await the sequel with longing. Highly recommended.

This review refers to the paperback edition I purchased, though I voluntarily received a mobi file version from the author. A positive review was not required and all opinions expressed are my own – including the opinion that these new covers are absolutely stunning!


Letters from the Dragon’s Son by Tammy Lash

Series: The White Wolf #2

Publisher: White Wolf Publishing

Release Date: October 14, 2020

Genre: Inspirational Fiction/General Fiction/Historical Fiction/Romance /Christian Fiction


2021 Selah Awards Finalist!

A father…

A son…

and the dragon they became.

One head: Malevolent, attired in barbs and spines, took pleasure in decimating the forested village.

Avery, formerly White Boar, wanders the forests seeking forgiveness from the people he sold into slavery, but is repentance payment enough?

Righteous, with two horns on each side, tried to calm the evil one’s violent ambition.

More servant than son, Jonathan Gudwyne, had been powerless to stop his father from taking the Men of the Forest into captivity. As a man, White Wolf reverses the damage he and his father caused by returning the Natives home. Jonathan gains honor and worship, but what does he do with the remains of his past? Justice has yet to be served to the dragon. Should Jonathan be the one who administers the sentence to his wandering father? To himself?

The two heads formed Brinsop, whose iron talons wrought chaos….

Can a man change? Can a broken family be made whole again? If one head is destroyed can the other survive?

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